April 2021Newsletter

Charlotte County Ostomy Support Group

A 501 (C) (3) nonprofit organization, (tax deductible donations) Website www.ccosg. org

Officers:

President: Jerry Downs………….941-629-7568…….fldowns@embarqmail,com Vice President: Ken Aukett……609-315-8115 Secretary: Lovelle Meester….612-240-2175 Treasurer: Lorelie Godbout….. 603-474-9063

Directors: Janice Creutzmann….910-382-2509 David Sandora….941-828-1076

Committees:

Newsletter: Lorelie Godbout Programs & Education: Jerry Downs, Gloria Patmore, RNET (retired)……..941-627-3077 Nancy Frank, RN, BSN, CWOCN ……………….941-629-5118 Marie Michel, RN, CWCA, CHRN, OMS………941-626-2607 Visitation: Nancy Frank, RN, BSN, CWOCN Library: Lorelie Godbout, RN (retired)

Professional Advisors:

John P. Rioux, MD, F.A.C.S. Nancy Frank, RN, BSN, CWOCN Marie Michel, RN, CWCA, CHRN, OMS

Charlotte County Ostomy Support Group Newsletter for April 16, 2021

Happy Spring, Easter and Earth Day

I hope everyone is still staying safe, healthy and getting your vaccine shots. Spring is here and hopefully we can enjoy it. Maybe we will be able to have meetings soon. A few articles I found that may be of interest.

MOISTURE MATH & MY ILEOSTOMY

By Sarah Biggart

Though having ileostomy surgery 15 years ago gave me my life and freedom back, it does bring its own unique set of concerns and challenges in daily activities and pouch changing schedule. I typically change my full appliance every fifth day.

Change day is day one, and I change my entire pouching system again on day five. I feel confident in my appliance, and this changing system has worked really well for me. Leaks are few and far between; however, as is true for most ostomates, they do happen occasionally. Leaks can happen to all of us, although my longest stretch without a leak is five years – not too shabby!

For me, my daily routine includes showering, exercising, getting sweaty – and weather permitting – swimming and jacuzziing in our community pool with my friends, family and neighbors. Even while doing all of these regularly, a five day wear time holds up for me.

So now, let’s talk what I like to call “Moisture Math”, and the moisture related variables that may affect my wear time.

Travel & Convenience:

If I am going away for the weekend, or traveling, I will do a full pouch change the night before I leave. I have always been a “better safe than sorry” girl, and being an ostomate has reinforced that mindset. If I can get away with not having to do a full pouch change in an unfamiliar setting, I will, just for my own ease and comfort. I’ve been held up traveling before, and it can feel stressful and uncertain. When you’ve had to sleep in an airport, just the added comfort of knowing I have a few days before needing to do a full change is just one less thing to be concerned about. So when setting off on a journey, I like to start with a freshly changed system.

Weather:

I live in a very mild climate, not too much heat and humidity at any given time. My Ostomysecrets® Underwear keeps my pouch away from my body, and it helps limit complaints about excessive heat and moisture. I am a person who enjoys travel and adventures! Sometimes I wind up in warmer, muggier parts of the world. On those sweaty days, walking and exploring in the heat, moisture math joins the pouching equation. A couple of summers ago my family, friends and I spent 10 days in Florida, in July. Between walking an average of 10 miles each day enjoying Walt Disney World, swimming in the pools, afternoon downpours daily and being a general sweaty mess, I went to a very strict every other day change. It was more moisture than I typically deal with, and going back to my better safe than sorry mentality, it seemed like my best course of action. My sting free ostomy care products helped to make frequent pouch changes more gentle on my peristomal skin. I would do my changes at night in our room, in the air conditioning, so that my wafer had plenty of time to adhere to my skin before heading back into the sweltering Florida heat.

Daily Activity:

We all find our own way of managing our changing schedule, most Ostomy Nurses (WOC nurses) would recommend 3 5 days of wear time. What I would definitely advise against is waiting until you HAVE to change due to a leak. Before you realize you have a problem, waste is coming into contact with your peristomal skin, and that may lead to skin damage. Above all, you want to keep your skin healthy, happy and intact. So when would my daily activity impact my wear time? Again it’s moisture math! I mentioned earlier that I like to swim and jacuzzi; a quick dip for an hour or so is very different than a big day out that involves being in a wet bathing suit all day. If I am planning a big day out on the water, in the pool, at a beach or waterpark, I figure that in to my changing schedule. For example if day one was Thursday, and day three is a big day out involving water, when I get home, I’ll typically shower and do a full change.

I’m always mitigating risk, and making smart, informed decisions regarding my ostomy. Adjusting my routine accordingly to moisture variables helps to keep my peristomal skin healthy allowing me to enjoy whatever life brings my way. Whether you are new to the ostomy world, or a seasoned pro like myself, planning ahead – just a little – may help you to experience life to the fullest.

More information from ConvaTec

Editor’s note: This educational article is from one of our digital sponsors, ConvaTec. Sponsor support along with donations from readers like you help to maintain our website and the free trusted resources of UOAA, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

NURSE SHARES 4 COMMON CONVEX OSTOMY SKIN BARRIER MYTHS

A convex ostomy skin barrier can help prevent output leakage and skin issues. Unfortunately, some misconceptions about convexity may keep people with ostomies from using it.

A convex pouching system refers to the shape of the back of the ostomy skin barrier – the side that goes against your skin. A convex skin barrier is not flat, rather it is curved or dome shaped. Using an integrated convex skin barrier is often referred to as “adding convexity” to a pouching system. This convexity provides a gentle push on the belly, allowing the stoma to protrude up and outward. This can help output go directly into the pouch and not under the skin barrier (which can cause a leak).

Common reasons for using convexity are to prevent leakage and related skin issues, and to avoid having to change the pouching system more frequently. If your pouching routine or body weight has changed, chances are it’s time to consider using a convex skin barrier.

Below are a few myths or misconceptions about using convexity:

1. All convexity is the same

Convexity should be chosen and customized based on your specific stoma and body shape. There are two main types of convexity: soft and firm. Soft convexity is flexible and conforms to your body as you move. Firm convexity is rigid and provides firm support around your stoma to help it stick out. In most cases, soft convex skin barriers are used on firmer abdomens, and firm convex skin barriers work best on softer abdomens. Someone may have a bad experience with convexity, only to learn that it was the wrong type for their stoma, body shape, or output. It’s important to know that the convex skin barrier opening needs to be close to the stoma in order to help the stoma protrude. This will also help reduce the possibility of leakage.

2. A convex skin barrier is uncomfortable or even painful

If your convex skin barrier is causing pain or discomfort, you are not wearing the right type of convexity. Based on your needs, and with guidance from a healthcare professional, consider trying some of the many convex barrier options available and see if they make a difference. The importance of addressing leakage should outweigh the fear of trying something different. Use the health of the skin around your stoma as a barometer. If your skin looks good, and you are not leaking, you’ll know you’re using the right type of ostomy skin barrier for a good fit.

3. I have to wait to use convexity

You don’t need to wait a certain amount of time before using a convex skin barrier. Each person is different. Some may need to add convexity immediately after surgery, while others may not need to add it at all. There is no concrete rule, and it depends on the type of stoma you have and how well it protrudes. If your belly is soft enough, you can start right away. Again, it’s important to prevent leakage while keeping the skin around your stoma healthy, and trying convexity could help accomplish both goals.

4. If my stoma is level with my skin, I need a convex skin barrier

In most cases this is true, but choosing a type of convexity can depend on your stoma output. There are always exceptions and everyone has different experiences. For example, someone who has a colostomy with formed stool and regular bowel habits may not need to use convexity, even if their stoma is flush to the skin. That’s because formed stool is unlikely to leak underneath the skin barrier. On the other hand, more liquid output can increase the chances of leakage.

Consider trying a convex ostomy skin barrier to see if it will help prevent leakage and skin issues, and increase your pouching system wear time (i.e., how long you can wear your skin barrier before it fails). Convex skin barriers come in both pre-cut and cut-to-fit options and are covered by most insurance plans. An ostomy nurse can help determine which type of convexity is right for you and when you should use it.

For more information on skin barrier convexity and other resources, visit the Hollister Ostomy Learning Center.

Terri Cobb earned her RN degree in 1991 and became a board-certified CWOCN in 2011. Currently on staff at the Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland, Ohio, her responsibilities include caring for ostomy patients of all age groups from the neonate and beyond. Terri interacts with patients in all phases of their journey from pre-op, to immediate post-op and through follow-up care. Financial Disclosure: Terri received compensation from Hollister Incorporated for her contributions to this article.

Editor’s note: This article is from one of our digital sponsors, Hollister Incorporated. Sponsor support along with donations from readers like you help to maintain our website and the free trusted resources of UOAA, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

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